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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
lengthy discussions with the democratic leader, harry reid of nevada, as well as former majority leader and my good friend, george mitchell of maine, on this very question. i came away from these conversations reassured that my independence would be respected and that no party line commitment would be required or expected. and so i've decided to affiliate myself with the democratic caucus, because doing so will allow me to take independent positions on issues as they arise and at the same time will allow me to be an effective representative of the people of maine. one final word. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. i'd like to repeat that. by associating myself with one side, i am not in automatic opposition to the other. in the situation of a republican house, a democratic senate but with substantial powers residing in the minority and a democratic president, no one party can control the outcome of our collective deliberations. as bill clinton might say, it's just arithmetic. in fact, this situation of a divided government has only two po
harry reid in nevada, the majority leader, and mitch mcconnell, of kentucky, the minority leader, both of them talking about why it is so difficult for democrats and republicans to compromise. h[video clip] >> we have a situation here where compromise is not what we do any more. in your program, john boehner said that he rejects the word compromise. that is exactly what he said. my friend, senator mcconnell, said that his single most important achievement is making sure the president -- that the president is a one-term president. >> compromise can be very difficult. we have different views on how much taxation and government should have, as well as regulation. it is not easy to reach agreement when you have a very different views of the direction the country should take. host: 60 minutes, talking about compromise. 44 state legislatures in play, "6000 seats at stake." we will be bringing you the results of gubernatorial races as well as house and senate races across the country. thomas joins us from frankfort, ky. hello, thomas. caller: i hope that you will give me as much time to state
, iowa, nevada, ohio what i put him over the top. he did not get anywhere near the progression. there are a lot of things going pondweeds, but the most important thing is that republicans is that they need to do something about their brand. it is basically the center of the republican party is older, white men. that is not where this country is going. when you look at african- americans, latinos, the fastest- growing group, asian. and the obama got 71% or 72% of the asian vote. the future does not look like the republican party. if i were the republican party, they will have to do some real soul-searching about immigration, social and cultural issues, because this is not a party design for the future. if this were a business, you would say they have an inherently flawed business model for the future. the republican party, they have four years they need because they are coming out for some candidates that are awfully exotic. [laughter] my wife got me to stop using the term "wacko." not only do they take themselves down, but they define their party in a way that keeps people who
on doors >> i think that is a good thing. the people in ohio, virginia, florida, nevada -- they took this election enormously seriously, understood the unique role they had to play. voters in battleground states understand they have a unique role a lot of us the citizens united to enjoy because they are not and state that will determine the president. >> the super pac's dynamic this time was obviously new and unprecedented. you had senate candidates -- sherrod brown in ohio had $40 million spent against him by super pac's. we had in the last week of our campaign $100 million spent against the president. that is more than the mccain campaign spent in its entirety. remarkable thing. a lot of senate candidates still one. but in house races it had an impact. barack obamashrod brown, governors -- ey have definition. the spending is a little less nefarious. it's still tough to deal with, but you are not somebody who is now and then somebody drops $4 million on youhead will have an impact. we have never seen spending like this. there is a term in politics called gross rating points, the amo
night? >> in nevada we talk about the third race -- their district, but the fourth district. he lost in the senate primary in 2010. that is the type of district democrats need to win in order to do well. overall i will be watching the seats that republicans favored or even lean republican. the reason why that is how far our are competitive list race democrats have to start winning in defeating republican members in order to get close to the majority. for not winning the heavy -- heavily republican seats, that it will not enough. >> look of the big picture, the balance of power. look at where the president a strong comeback there romney is strong. will there be coattails for the house seats in state by state battles? >> i think the most impact we've seen from the presidential race has already happened. i know in talking to democrats that are running the races, that first debate was fundamentally important, not just because it shifted the presidential debate, but because it was a time when house candidates registered to go on television, try to prove a moderate credentials. that first
in marco rubio leading this fight. we have governor martinez in the mexico. brian sandoval in nevada, governor. these are people that are leaders in our party right now. they connect with what are believes are. they generally connect with what our beliefs are. but this immigration the issue over the last 10 years has become very real politics in our party or you don't want to talk about exports. when mitt romney got asked in the debates about immigration it was like a very awkward. he was like, what do i do with my hands? marcogot to talk about rubio leads the charge on. he talks about immigration. that is what our party needs to talk about. it cannot be an issue that we avoid. >> let's go to the audience. a couple of ground rules. we ask that you would until microphone comes around and that you state your question in the form of a question. right here. and then there. >> alex from the cato institute. seems to be disagreement on the panel about whether a guest worker visa would be a good way to go for. ramesh has an assimilationist point of view and brad says this is a good way as th
've got governor martinez in new mexico. we've got brian sandoval, governor in nevada. these are people who are leaders in our party right now, right now. so they connect with what our beliefs are. they generally connect what our police are but this issue of immigration i believe in the last eight to 10 years has become third world politics in our party. where you don't want to talk about it. when mitt romney got into debates about immigration it was like very awkward but he's like what i do with my hands, you know? we've got to talk about. that's what marco rubio leads the charge of every time he talks about anything he talks to immigration, and that is what our party needs to talk about. it's an issue we can't avoid. >> we're going to go to the audience here. just a couple ground close to ask that you wait for a microphone to come around. and that you state your question in the form of a question. so we have a question right here and then we'll go there next. >> hi. outlooks from the cato institute. there seems to be some disagreement on the panel about whether guestworker visas are g
this fight. we have governor suzannia martinez in new mexico. brian sandoval, governor in nevada. these are people that are leaders in our party right now, right now. so they connect with what our beliefs are. they generally connect with our what our beliefs are but this issue of immigration, i believe, in the last eight to ten years has become third level politics in our party where you don't want to talk about it. candidates, when mitt romney got asked in the debates about immigration, it was like very awkward. he was like what do i do with my hands. we got to talk about it. that's what marco rubio leads the charge on. every time he talks about anything, he talks about immigration and that is what our party needs to talk about. can't be issues we avoid. >> we're going to go to the audience here. a couple ground rules. i ask you wait for a microphone to come around. and that you state your question in the form of a question. so we have a question right here and go there next. >> hi, i'm from the cato institute. there seems to be some disagroment on the panel about whether guest
. >> callerare you there? we will try paul and boulder city nevada back your democrats line. paul, hello? >> caller: thank you for c-span. watching the president's comments, he's not going to take a hardline on whether the attacks which are going to go back to the clinton era. i don't understand why this president is not, i mean, as before, i hope we're not seeing a repeat, you know, the progressives and liberals really push him over the line along with labor. you know, he's got to take a stronger stance because the republicans, mitch mcconnell and cantor and boehner, they are not, you know, really acknowledging that the people have sent the message to them. that they want this president agenda, and they want them to work together. they are not acknowledging that. okay, i understand what he's trying to say to take your of the middle class first, but as far as i'm concerned, you know, 39.6%, you know, is more than reasonable. i think after they've had almost 12 years of tax breaks and 300% growth in the last 30 years in the upper 1%, i think they ought to be paying maybe 40%. >> host: pau
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)